About Us

The NAACP Albemarle–Charlottesville Branch was formed July 12, 2001 upon approval of a merger request from the Albemarle and Charlottesville branches. This merger has allowed the two localities to be more effective in working to ensure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights of all persons and to eliminate racial hatred and racial discrimination.

In 2003, then-president of the Albemarle-Charlottesville Branch, Dr. M. Rick Turner, was instrumental in revitalizing the University of Virginia NAACP College Chapter serving as its faculty advisor. The college chapter has been visible and active on the University of Virginia campus. Both the president and faculty co-advisor of the college chapter serve on the executive committee for the Branch, allowing the two organizations to maintain ongoing communications and collaboration.

Today, we continue to address civil rights issues as we work to promote understanding, harmony, and racial justice for all Americans in our community. In addition to two major events per year, the Albemarle-Charlottesville NAACP provides the community with opportunities to join in its work and commitment to its mission. Please see below to learn the history of the Albemarle and Charlottesville Branches.

REMINDER

Let’s always remember that the NAACP is a civil rights organization and the community depends on us to speak out against injustice.  NAACP with its challenging history will remain vigilant and steadfast in supporting our mission. 

All officers and executive committee members of the local branch of the NAACP work on a volunteer basis to address civil rights complaints and issues. The NAACP Albemarle-Charlottesville Branch is led by a dedicated group of volunteers serving in various capacities.

The officers and members of the Executive Committee for 2017 are as follows:

President: Janette B. Martin
Vice-President: TBA
Secretary:  Lynn M. Boyd
Treasurer: Janice C. Spellman

The list of committees, their charge, and their chair are available on our Committee webpage.

HISTORY

History of Albemarle County Branch

In the early 1950’s Lewis Carter, a black World War II veteran was hit and killed by a white man in a speeding car on a small town road in Western Albemarle County. The citizens of Crozet felt that the local courts and law enforcement officials did not treat the matter seriously enough. A group of black people met to take action, including Fields Wood, Marvin Washington, Marion Wood, and Virgil Wood as well as members of several churches in the Yancey Mills, Crozet, and Greenwood communities. They contacted Oliver Hill and Spotswood Robinson of the Richmond law firm, Hill & Robinson. The family of Lewis Carter eventually won a settlement of the case. From this group, the Albemarle County Branch Chapter of the NAACP was formed. A charter was obtained on December 14, 1953, making this branch one of the oldest branches in the state of Virginia.

History of Charlottesville Branch

Reverend Benjamin F. Bunn organized the Charlottesville Branch of the NAACP in 1947. The Charlottesville Branch was an active member and supporter of the Virginia State Conference. Throughout the years, the Charlottesville Branch received many national and state NAACP honors and awards. The Charlottesville Branch played an integral part in the state of Virginia‘s massive resistance struggle.